MMTM 2016

Now that Momentum/EMC World is almost done, time for a quick recap. Announcements in the ECD’s keynote have covered Leap (Project Horizon), Documentum 7.3 and InfoArchive 4.0.

If you want to get detailed information on these, you can check the usual sources:

And don’t forget about the “Ask the expert” session about Leap

Thoughts after reading the news and watching the streamings and webcasts:

Good:

  • Leap looks nice. Integration with existing Documentum installations is good. Free for existing customers is the best way to push it (check the spark blog link for more info on licensing and TGS blog for initial prices)
  • Documentum for CentOs+PostgreSQL (finally!!!) and support for docker (cool!) to reduce TCO
  • Removal of UCF/Java from Webtop/D2 (THANK GOD) and support for Chrome/Edge (about time…)

Not so good:

  • Leap integration with DCTM is done through CMIS, but it seems like apps are not quite there yet. I suspect we won’t be able to use Leap against CS until 7.3 is released (or maybe later). I also don’t like CMIS too much, because even though is a standard, it’s missing a lot of specific features (for every vendor), so we’ll have too see how that works.
  • Docker is cool, but I still don’t have a clear picture of how it will work with Documentum. We’ll have to wait and see what EMC provides. Besides, if you want to reduce cost of upgrades, you should provide detailed information of what has changed (wdk classes, api reference, etc.) as most of the time that takes to perform an upgrade is lost in tracing changes in applications and why feature x stopped working (same with patch releases)
  • I still would love if EMC would remove once and for all dmbasic scripts from the installation process and methods, although that looks like a lost battle
  • No word about ECD’s future, it was something to expect but still disappointing

Bad:

  • DCTM 7.3 would be available first in EMC’s cloud environment to “debug” it with customers. I’m quite sure that knowing the history of bugs of Documentum (and the pace at what those are resolved) this will most likely backfire on them. If you want to deliver a solid-rock product, then what you should do is fixing reported bugs fast (instead of having to report same bug several times without luck or wasting time with support), not have (paying) customers beta-testing the product for months

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